Principal Residence Gain Exclusion Break

Here’s a look at how to apply the $250,000 ($500,000, if married) principal residence tax break when getting married or divorced, or when converting another property into your home. In both marriage and divorce situations, a home sale often occurs. Of course, the...

Prorated Principal Residence Gain Exclusion Break

Here’s good news. IRS regulations allow you to claim a prorated (reduced) gain exclusion—a percentage of the $250,000 or $500,000 exclusion in select circumstances. The prorated gain exclusion equals the full $250,000 or $500,000 figure (whichever would otherwise...

The Principal Residence Gain Exclusion Break

The $250,000 ($500,000, if married) home sale gain exclusion break is one of the great tax-saving opportunities. Unmarried homeowners can potentially exclude gains up to $250,000, and married homeowners can potentially exclude up to $500,000. You as the seller need...

IRS Defines Real Property for Section 1031 Like-Kind Exchanges

Do you own business or investment property that has gone up in value? Would you like to acquire new property? If you sell the old property, you’ll have to pay tax on your profits. Don’t do that. Instead, do a tax-deferred Section 1031 transaction. With a properly...