Principal Residence Gain Exclusion Break

Here’s a look at how to apply the $250,000 ($500,000, if married) principal residence tax break when getting married or divorced, or when converting another property into your home. In both marriage and divorce situations, a home sale often occurs. Of course, the...

Prorated Principal Residence Gain Exclusion Break

Here’s good news. IRS regulations allow you to claim a prorated (reduced) gain exclusion—a percentage of the $250,000 or $500,000 exclusion in select circumstances. The prorated gain exclusion equals the full $250,000 or $500,000 figure (whichever would otherwise...

The Principal Residence Gain Exclusion Break

The $250,000 ($500,000, if married) home sale gain exclusion break is one of the great tax-saving opportunities. Unmarried homeowners can potentially exclude gains up to $250,000, and married homeowners can potentially exclude up to $500,000. You as the seller need...

Combine Home Sale with the 1031 Exchange

The tax-saving strategy is to combine the tax-avoidance advantage of the principal residence gain exclusion break with the tax-deferral advantage of a Section 1031 like-kind exchange. With proper planning, you can accomplish this tax-saving double play with full IRS...